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Comércio e Cooperação

Comércio e Cooperação

(2009): As exportações - US $36,7 milhões: reexportados: combustível, peixes e mariscos, vestuário e calçado.

Importações - US $746,3 milhões: bens de consumo, bens intermediários, matéria-prima, petróleo.

Principais parceiros comerciais, exportações - Espanha 62%, Portugal 34%, França 3%, Estados Unidos 1%.

Principais parceiros comerciais, importações - Portugal 48%, nos Países Baixos 17%, Espanha 10%, Brasil 4%, Alemanha 2%.

Ano fiscal: ano civil.

Moeda: Escudo (CVEsc + $79USD, Fevereiro de 2010), que está indexado ao Euro.

Outros parceiros importantes - Portugal (US $43 milhões); União Europeia (US $22 milhões); Banco Mundial-IDA (US $21 milhões); Luxemburgo (US $15 milhões); Países Baixos (US $10 milhões); os Estados Unidos (mais de 110 milhões de dólares).

Cape Verde has few natural resources and suffers from poor rainfall and limited fresh water. Only 4 of the 10 main islands ( Santiago , Santo Antao, Fogo, and Brava) normally support significant agricultural production, and over 90% of all food consumed in Cape Verde is imported. Mineral resources include salt, pozzolana (a volcanic rock used in cement production), and limestone.

The economy of Cape Verde is service-oriented, with commerce, transport, and public services accounting for more than 70% of GDP. Although nearly 70% of the population lives in rural areas, agriculture and fishing contribute only about 9% of GDP. Light manufacturing accounts for most of the remainder. An amount estimated at about 20% of GDP is contributed to the domestic economy through remittances from expatriate Cape Verdeans .

Since 1991, the government has pursued market-oriented economic policies, including an open welcome to foreign investors and a far-reaching privatization program. It established as top development priorities the promotion of market economy and of the private sector; the development of tourism, light manufacturing industries, and fisheries; and the development of transport, communications, and energy facilities. From 1994 to 2000 there was a total of about $407 million in foreign investments made or planned, of which 58% were in tourism, 17% in industry, 4% in infrastructure, and 21% in fisheries and services.

Fish and shellfish are plentiful, and small quantities are exported. Cape Verde has cold storage and freezing facilities and fish processing plants in Mindelo, Praia , and on Sal.

Cape Verde's strategic location at the crossroads of mid-Atlantic air and sea lanes has been enhanced by significant improvements at Mindelo's harbor (Porto Grande) and Praia’s harbor, and at Sal's and Praia's international airports. New international airports were opened in Boa Vista (December 2007) and Sao Vicente (December 2009). Ship repair facilities at Mindelo were opened in 1983. The major ports are Mindelo and Praia , but all other islands have smaller port facilities. In addition to the international airport on Sal, airports have been built on all of the inhabited islands, although the airports on Brava and Santo Antao are now closed. All other airports enjoy scheduled air service. The archipelago has 3,050 kilometers (1,830 mi.) of roads, of which 1,010 kilometers (606 mi.) are paved, most using cobblestone.

The Government of Cape Verde has launched an ambitious plan to reduce the country's dependence on imported fossil fuels through increased energy production from renewable resources. Through private-sector investment and government-supported projects, Cape Verde intends to generate at least 50% of electricity from renewable sources by the year 2020, up from the current level of 3.2%.

Future prospects depend heavily on the maintenance of aid flows, the encouragement of tourism, remittances, outsourcing labor to neighboring African countries, and the momentum of the government's development program.

On November 22, 2010, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) approved a 15-month Policy Support Instrument (PSI) to consolidate macroeconomic stability, maintain fiscal discipline, and achieve sustained growth for Cape Verde . The PSI is designed for countries that may not need IMF financial assistance, but still seek IMF advice, monitoring, and endorsement of their policy frameworks based on country-owned poverty reduction strategies adopted in a participatory process involving civil society and development partners.


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